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What to see in Bolivia

Lake Titicaca

On the Altiplano and surrounded by the imposing snowy peaks of the Andes, the 8500 square kilometres of Lake Titicaca extend almost equally between Peru and Bolivia. It is the highest navigable lake in the world due at 3800 metres above sea level, where oxygen is scarce.On the shores of the lake extends the city of Copacabana, dedicated mainly to tourism and which is accessed by crossing the Strait of Tiquina. Its most important construction is the immaculate Basilica of Our Lady of Copacabana.

To the south of the lake and two hours from Copacabana, you arrive at Puerto Norte or Puerto Sur on the Isla del Sol, the largest of the lake, whose inhabitants live off of subsistence agriculture, crafts, herding and tourism.

It is said that the Inca civilization was born here, and in this period it was a sanctuary with a temple dedicated to the Sun God of Viracocha.

In the southern part, inhabited by the Yumani Indians, you can see the Inca Stairs, the Fountain of the Three Waters, the archaeological ruins of the Pilkokaina Temple and viewpoints such as Pallakasa, where you can see some of the best sunsets in the world.

10 km by boat or by walking along a path, you reach the northern part of the lake, where the Challapampa community, also of Quechua and Aymara origin, is located.Here you can find the Gold Museum of the Submerged City María Pampa where you can see precious archaeological objects. 45 minutes from this is the Ritual Complex of the Sacred Rock, with archaeological remains and sacred places such as the ritual table, and the ruins of Chincana known as the Labyrinth of the stone walls, where the priests lived.

8km from the Isla del Sol is the Isla de la Luna, where the Palace of the Virgins and the Temple of the Moon stand out as important tourist attractions.

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